Sausage Veggie Hash (GF & Allergen-Free)

Sausage Veggie Hash

The Mickey Mouse apron is courtesy of my in-laws who brought it back from Disney World.

The hubby and I (yep, all married now!) have been experimenting with breakfast options.  Due to my various food foes (namely gluten and dairy), breakfast is a tricky meal but hash seems to be working out quite nicely for relaxing Saturday mornings.  We’ve tried a couple different types now, which I’ll have to post later.  This one is the slightly modified version of Sausage Veggie Hash from Tammy Credicott’s cookbook The Healthy Gluten-Free Life: 200 Delicious Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Soy-free & Egg-Free Recipes.  Tammy likes to cook with coconut oil and, since I’m allergic, I swapped it for olive oil.  I also used red potatoes just because I liked them and it’s what we had on hand.

I like how easy this recipe is because it won’t take too long to put together in the mornings (or at any other time of the day).

Ingredients: 

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 lb. breakfast sausage (I used GF chicken sausage)
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 4 red potatoes, diced (or 2 regular potatoes)
  • 3 medium zucchinis (sliced and quartered)
  • 1 medium sized avocado

Directions:  

  1. Heat olive oil up in a skillet.  Then, add breakfast sausage and cook until it’s no longer pink.  Remove the sausage from the skillet and put it off to the side.
  2. Cook diced onions in the skillet for a minute.
  3. Add potatoes. Cook until tender and brown (you’ll want to cook it on a lower setting so that it doesn’t  burn).
  4. Add zucchini, and cook for a couple of minutes until softened.
  5. Mix the sausage in.
  6. Serve hash in a bowl with slices of avocado on top.

Chocolate, Almond Pancakes (gluten-free)

Pancakes[Update: I’m now allergic to dairy and eggs, but it’s still a good recipe.  So I’ve left it on the blog]

Due to blood sugar issues, I find that if I eat too many pancakes all at once it makes me feel sort of off because I’m not getting enough protein.  So I recently bought my very first bag of almond flour because it’s supposed to be a nice way of adding protein to things.  I also found that I really liked the rich, slightly sweet hint that the almond flour added to the pancakes.

Providing I use a sugar-free syrup, I found that with the addition of almond flour I didn’t really notice my blood sugar doing anything funky.  If that’s not enough of an adjustment for your blood sugar though, try making it a full-on gourmet breakfast buy cooking up some bacon or eggs to go along with it.          


Allergen/Sensitivity Info: Gluten/wheat-free, sugar-free, nut-free.

Yields: About a dozen small pancakes.

Ingredients:

  • About 1 cup brown rice flour
  • 2 tablespoons almond flour
  • 2 tablespoon Splenda (or any generic version of sucralose)
  • 1 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder (read the ingredient label to be sure it’s safe)
  • 1 teaspoon coco powder (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil

Optional Ingredients:

  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 banana cut up into small pieces (if you’re not too keen on bananas, apples or blueberries also work well)

Directions:

  1. Mix buttermilk/sour milk, cooking oil, egg in a bowl.
  2. Add to tablespoons of almond flour to a 1 cup measuring cup.  Then, fill it the rest of the way with brown rice flour.
  3. Combine the remaining ingredients in a separate bowl.  Then, mix the contents of both bowls together.  Don’t worry about getting all of the lumps out.
  4. If the batter is too runny add more rice flour, if it’s too thick add more milk.  The almond flour tends to be very absorptive, so it’s more likely you’ll need to add more milk.
  5. Pour 1/4 cup batter onto an already greased griddle/skillet (it should make about a dozen pancakes).
  6. Cook them on a medium heat—if the heat is too high, the outside of the pancake will burn before the center is fully cooked.
  7. Wait until the pancakes are just beginning to get bubbly and the edges are starting to turn a light brown before turning them over.
  8. Top with as much butter and sugar-free syrup as you like.  And enjoy.

Oatmeal Muffins (gluten-free & sugar-free)

Muffins[Update: Sadly, due to things like eggs, milk, and oats this recipe is no longer something I can eat.  But it’s yummy, so I’ve left it on the blog]

My gluten-free oatmeal muffins were very loosely based on the basic muffin recipe in my Better Homes and Gardens® Cook Book.  Even though I can’t eat most of the recipes without making alterations, it’s still one of my favorite cookbooks because it’s great for getting ideas and the cooking tips and suggestions are helpful.  I love it.       

I was very happy with how well these muffins turned out.  And, to my surprise, the wheat-eaters in the family even enjoyed them, commenting how they wouldn’t have known they were gluten-free.  The oatmeal (gluten-free variety, of course) added texture, which was nice since most nuts are off limits due to allergies.  Perhaps next time I’ll try banana or blueberry.  What are your favorite types of muffins?


Serving: Makes 12 muffins (if you’re using a standard sized cupcake tin)

Ingredients:

  • 1 and 1/3 cup rice flour
  • 3/4 cup oats (most oats are not gluten-free, so I recommend Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-free Oats)
  • 1 cup Spenda (or generic brand of sucralose)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 1/4 cup cooking oil

Directions:

1.  Place liners in the cupcake tin.

Step 1

2.  Mix dry ingredients together in a bowl (everything except the oil, milk, and egg).  In a separate bowl, mix the wet ingredients together.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix until moistened (it’s fine if it’s still lumpy).

Step 2

3.  Spoon the batter into the cupcake liners, leaving room for them to grow (filling about 2/3 of the way seems to work well).

DSCF0764

4.  Bake at 400 degrees for 18 minutes (a toothpick should come out clean).

5.  They can be served hot, but they’ll be more apt to fall apart when you’re eating them.  Or if you let them cool in the refrigerator before eating, they’ll hold together better.  Whenever you decide to serve them, enjoy.  They taste great with butter.

Step 5 (2)

Banana Bread (gluten & sugar free)

DSCN1080[Udpate: Due to new found allergies, no longer something I can eat.  But because I liked it I’ve left it on the blog for those who are just gluten-free]

Due to snow-related power outages, I hadn’t cooked anything new for a few days.  During the storm, my family and I ended up eating the toppings for the pizza I’d planned to make, so I was out of ideas and out of ingredients.

But the bananas in the kitchen were just on the verge of becoming unusable, so on a whim I decided to try and make banana bread.  And the result was quite tasty.


Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Bob’s Red Mill white rice flour
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons baking power (be sure to check that it’s gluten-free)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 beaten eggs
  • 1 and 1/2 cups mashed bananas (works out to about four to five bananas)
  • 1 and 1/4 cups Splenda (or any generic form of sucralose)
  • 1/2 cup cooking oil or melted butter

Directions:

  1. Grease the bottom and sides of loaf pan.
  2. Combine first six ingredients in a bowl—rice flour, baking power, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine eggs, bananas, Splenda, and melted butter/cooking oil.
  4. Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture.  Combine until all of it is moist, but don’t worry about getting out all the lumps.
  5. Spoon the batter into the pre-greased pan.  And bake at 350 F for 40 minutes (or until a knife comes out clean).
  6. Let the loaf cool completely once it’s done baking.  Then, wrap it in plastic wrap or foil and store it in the refrigerator overnight.  If you’re antsy and can’t wait for morning, your banana bread will be crumbly but it’ll still taste great!

Banana Buttermilk Pancakes (gluten-free)

DSCN0779[Update: Due to newly discovered dairy and egg allergies, I can no longer eat these pancakes.  But they’re tasty so I left them on the blog]

After going gluten-free due to celiac, pancakes were one of the foods I missed the most.  I’ve tried the various gluten-free pancake mixes, but most of them tasted odd or were flatter than … well … a pancake.

What I finally discovered worked the best was to modify a standard pancake recipe (changing at least the flour and baking powder).

Don’t be fooled, just because there are gluten-free mixes doesn’t mean you can’t make it yourself.  In fact, it’s likely both tastier and cheaper if you make it from scratch.  I’ve even gotten several wheat-eating folks to quite happily scarf down some of these light, fluffy pancakes for breakfast and dinner.


Allergen/Sensitivity Info: Gluten/wheat-free, sugar-free, nut-free.

Yields: About a dozen small pancakes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Stone Ground White Rice Flour, but any gluten-free white or brown rice flour will do just fine (do NOT use garbanzo bean flour for pancakes, though, because it cooks oddly and tastes horrible.  It’s much better saved for baking)
  • 1 tablespoon Splenda(or any generic version of sucralose)
  • 1 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1 cup buttermilk or sour milk (for sour milk, place 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar in a measuring cup and add enough milk to equal 1 cup total liquid.  Then let it sit for about five minutes)
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil

Optional Ingredients:

  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 banana cut up into small pieces (if you’re not too keen on bananas, apples or blueberries also work well)

Directions:

  1. Mix buttermilk/sour milk, cooking oil, egg, and a banana in a bowl.
  2. Combine the remaining ingredients in a separate bowl.  Then, mix the contents of both bowls together.  Don’t worry about getting all of the lumps out.
  3. If the batter is too runny add more rice flour, if it’s too thick add more buttermilk/sour milk.
  4. Pour 1/4 cup batter onto an already greased griddle/skillet (it should make about a dozen pancakes).
  5. Cook them on a medium heat — if the heat is too high, the outside of the pancake will burn before the center is fully cooked.
  6. Wait until the pancakes are bubbly and the edges are beginning to turn golden brown before turning them over.
  7. Top with as much butter and sugar-free syrup as you like.  And enjoy.

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